Research Program in Political Economy

RPPE

About RPPE

Created by the joint initiative of the Politics Department, the Economics Department, and the Princeton School of Public and International Affairs, the Research Program in Political Economy (RPPE) supports scholarship at the intersection of economics and political science.

Designed to facilitate greater interaction across departments at Princeton as well as with the broader disciplines, the program sponsors research workshops and colloquia, conferences, short-term visits to Princeton by scholars who work in political economy, and grants to students to aid their research in political economy.

Research Highlights

Germán Gieczewski: Policy Persistence and Drift in Organizations
Dec. 4, 2018

I analyze the evolution of organizations that allow free entry and exit of members, such as cities, trade unions, sports clubs and cooperatives. Current members choose a policy for the organization, but this, in turn, may lead to new agents joining or dissatisfied members leaving, yielding a new set of policymakers tomorrow. The resulting…

Leeat Yariv: Affirmative Action in the Lab
Oct. 18, 2018

We present results from laboratory experiments studying the impacts of affirmative- action policies. We induce statistical discrimination in simple labor-market interactions between firms and workers. We then introduce affirmative-action policies that vary in the size and duration of a subsidy firms receive for hiring discriminated-against…

PE Students on the Market: Ted Enamorado
Sept. 19, 2018

Integrating information from multiple sources plays a key role in social science research. However, when a unique identifier that unambiguously links records is not available, merging datasets can be a difficult and error-prone endeavor. In “Active Learning for Probabilistic Record Linkage”, I propose an active learning algorithm which…

Thomas Fujiwara: The Origins of Human Pro-Sociality
Aug. 17, 2018

Human pro-sociality towards non-kin is ubiquitous and almost unique in the animal kingdom. It remains poorly understood, though a proliferation of theories has arisen to explain it. We present evidence from survey data and from laboratory treatment of experimental subjects that is consistent with a set of theories based on group level selection…

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