Grants

Financial Support for Graduate Research

The Research Program in Political Economy supports a program of financial assistance for outstanding research proposals by graduate students in Princeton's departments of Politics and Economics and the Woodrow Wilson School.

The program consists of grants of up to $2500 designed to cover expenses incurred by graduate students in research projects at the intersection of economics and politics. These expenses may include the purchase of software, data, and other research materials necessary to the research project. The program does not cover the purchase of equipment or travel. Interested applicants should submit a clear research proposal, an explicit budget justification, and a CV to Lindsay Woodrick (lwtwo@princeton.edu). Decisions will be made on a rolling basis, but applications should be made well in advance of the desired date of the funds.

 

White Papers and Case Studies in Public Policy and Political Economy

The Research Program in Political Economy provides grants of up to $1000 to master students in public policy and public administration for the development of case studies and white papers on topics at the intersection of Political Economy and Public Policy. Interested applicants should submit a proposal and a CV to Lindsay Woodrick (lwtwo@princeton.edu). Decisions will be made on a rolling basis. 

 

Lab and Field Experiments in Political Economy

The Research Program in Political Economy offers a small number of grants per year to affiliated students and faculty to partially support lab and field experiments in Political Economy.  

The program consists of grants of up to $4000 designed to cover expenses directly associated with the experiment. Interested applicants should submit a clear research proposal, an explicit budget justification, and a CV to Lindsay Woodrick (lwtwo@princeton.edu). Decisions will be made on a rolling basis, but applications should be made well in advance of the desired date of the funds.

Visitors

RPPE sponsors short visits to Princeton by scholars who work on topics in political economy.  Visitors are generally here for a full week during an academic term and participate in research activities with faculty and students, present a seminar, and also make an informal presentation/lecture to our graduate students. They also are available to meet with faculty and graduate students on an individual basis.